Boating Business | The Vendée Globe is still going ahead

THE VENDÉE GLOBE IS STILL GOING AHEAD

HOMENEWSCOVID-19THE VENDÉE GLOBE IS STILL GOING AHEAD

15 May 2020

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The Vendée Globe is still scheduled for a November start. Photo credit: Vincent Curutchet / DPPI / Vendée Globe

Plans are continuing to start the Vendée Globe round the world sailing race in November.

Organisers the Vendée Council and the SAEM Vendée say their goal is to maintain the start date of November 8 with nothing prevent the racing as long as national authorities allow that to be the case.

However, they say the event belongs to the local people and the presence of the public is important.

The race starts from Les Sables d’Olonne with past British competitors including Dame Ellen MacArthur, Pete Goss and Mike Golding.

A preparatory ten-day solo race taking the sailors up past Iceland and into the Arctic Circle and then down to the Azores, was initially scheduled for June but this has been postponed until July.

Organisers now say they are studying every possible situation to be able to welcome the public at an event like this in the economic and public health context, the evolution of which is hard to predict.

via Boating Business | The Vendée Globe is still going ahead.

Boating Business | New CEO at World Sailing

NEW CEO AT WORLD SAILING

HOMENEWSPEOPLENEW CEO AT WORLD SAILING

07 May 2020

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David Graham is the newly appointed CEO of World Sailing

David Graham has been appointed CEO of World Sailing. He will take up his post on July 13 2020.

David has more than 20 years’ sailing experience with previous career roles including sales, events, coaching and sponsorship, including CEO and MD posts.

His most recent role was CEO at Oman Sail, a national initiative that uses sport to contribute to the development of the Omani people.

Prior to his tenure at Oman Sail, David managed a sailing school before spending more than a decade in senior positions at dinghy manufacturers.

David has been an active sailor throughout his life, first dinghy sailing and has also been involved in major big boat series and races onboard both monohulls and multihulls. He has recently taking up kiteboarding.

“As World Sailing looks to the future and the next phase of growth, we are confident that with David’s combined background in management and sailing that he is the right leader to help restructure and provide a strong direction for the operations of our organisation,” said Kim Andersen, World Sailing president.

via Boating Business | New CEO at World Sailing.

Boating Business | English boaters can return

ENGLISH BOATERS CAN RETURNHOMENEWSCOVID-19ENGLISH BOATERS CAN RETURN11 May 2020EmailShareFacebookLinkedInTwitterPrintMDL is now allowing berth holders to carry out work on their boatsINDUSTRY DATABASEROYAL YACHTING ASSOCIATIONBoaters in England can return to the water from Wednesday, according to the RYA’s interpretation of the Government’s latest announcement stating unlimited outdoor activity is now allowed following the coronavirus lockdown.However, confusion remains with many marina operators still not allowing their berth holders to access the water.In an email to berth holders, Michael Glanville, MD of MDL that operates 18 marinas and 13 boatyards in the UK, said while boaters can now carry out work on their craft, it is still not permitted for them to get out onto the water.The RYA that has been lobbying the Government for the resumption of boating saying it can be resumed safely.“From Wednesday, 13 May unlimited outdoor activity will be permitted in England and we understand that this will include all forms of boating,” said the RYA in a statement.“Any activity will still need to be alone or with members of a single household and social distancing must be followed at all times.”Port authoritiesIn his email, Michael said MDL is waiting for any leisure boating changes from the port authorities.He continued: “We have social distancing measures in place and look forward to welcoming people coming to perform maintenance and security checks on their boats.“And while we understand the reasoning behind the government’s decision to ease lock down rules, in the way it has, we share your frustration about not being able to get out onto the water just yet.”And he said contractors have been able to continue to access MDL’s sites for essential maintenance during the lock down.Following the latest Government announcement, more tenant businesses will now be able to use their offices with staff working on site.In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, the return to boating has not yet been confirmed and it is not yet known when clubs and training centres will be able to reopen their doors.

via Boating Business | English boaters can return.

Boating Business | Plans to lift lockdown for boating

PLANS TO LIFT LOCKDOWN FOR BOATING

HOMENEWSCOVID-19PLANS TO LIFT LOCKDOWN FOR BOATING

04 May 2020

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Private boating is now allowed around Guernsey

Guernsey and Ireland are making tentative preparations to lift the COVID-19 lockdown.

The Irish Taoiseach has issued a five point plan to re-open the country in a phased way whilst Guernsey has issued guidance to recreational boat owners.

The five point plan in Ireland has been broadly welcomed by the sailing community although clarity is needed. From 18 May, outdoor spaces and tourism sites in Ireland can re-open, a move which has largely been seen by marinas as allowing them also to re-open. Phase 2 from 8 June will put boats back on the water for sailing and training and Phase 3 beginning on 29 June might allow racing to restart. Phase 4 on 20 July will see sports competitions resume with limitations on spectator numbers whilst phase 5 on 10 August sees a further relaxation with gyms re-opening and close physical contact sports and festivals resuming, again with caveats such as regular cleaning and social distancing.

Guernsey

Recreational boat owners in Guernsey will now be able to use their boats in local waters provided the latest weather forecast has been obtained, the vessel inspected before use and all surfaces and objects frequently cleaned. Social distancing must be followed with skippers only accompanied by members of their own household or, where the boat is large enough to allow social distancing, one other person from a different household.

Landing on Alderney, Sark and Herm is not currently permitted and skippers and crew are advised that they must self-isolate for 14 days if they make landfall outside of the Bailiwick’s waters.

via Boating Business | Plans to lift lockdown for boating.

Boating Business | Tall Ships designer dies

TALL SHIPS DESIGNER DIES

HOMENEWSBOATBUILDINGBOATBUILDINGTALL SHIPS DESIGNER DIES

04 May 2020

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Colin Mudie RDI Photo: Advertiser & Times

Tributes are being paid to Colin Mudie RDI, yacht and tall ships designer, balloonist, author and inclusive-sailing advocate, who died in March aged 93.

Contemporary of Edmund Hilary and Donald Campbell, whom he knew, Colin forged his reputation as an adventurer, supporting sail-training and charities, particularly those dedicated to disabled sailors, whilst designing some of the world’s most memorable tall ships.

“He will be remembered by the international tall ships family with great fondness and his legacy will be with us for many decades to come,” said Paul Bishop, head of race directorate at Sail Training International.

Born in Edinburgh in 1926, Colin studied engineering at Southampton University before serving his design apprenticeship at the British Power Boat Company in Southampton. After working for designers Laurent Giles and Partners in Lymington, he set up his own firm.

Atlantic adventures

Colin successfully completed a 1952 Atlantic crossing in the 19ft Sopranino without radio or engine and in 1958 attempted to cross the Atlantic again, this time in a hydrogen balloon.

“After 94 hours the balloon crash landed but dad had designed the gondola as a boat and he took command and they sailed 1,500 miles to Barbardos, arriving two weeks later,” said his son, Max.

It was perhaps as a designer of tall ships that Colin was best known. In 1971 he won a Lloyd’s Register Award for Royalist, a 23m sailing training brig for the British Sea Cadet Corps and designed a number of other tall ships throughout the 1980s including the 43m barque STS Lord Nelson.

Colin’s charitable involvements included the RNLI, of which is was a life vice-president and part of his local crew in Lymington. He was also involved in the Jubilee Sailing Trust whose mission is to give everyone, regardless of ability, the chance to enjoy sailing.

via Boating Business | Tall Ships designer dies.

Boating Business | SailGP 2020 is suspended

SAILGP 2020 IS SUSPENDED

HOMENEWSCOVID-19SAILGP 2020 IS SUSPENDED

04 May 2020

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No further SailGP racing will take place until 2021

INDUSTRY DATABASE

SAILGP

SailGP has suspended its racing for the remainder of 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic – including the Cowes event due to take place in August.

SailGP season two events will now be rescheduled for 2021 with a minimum of seven worldwide events planned.

“The global nature of our league is one of our strongest characteristics, as we bring together top talent from all over the world to both organise and compete in a new form of professional racing,” said SailGP CEO Sir Russell Coutts. “As we face this health emergency, our geographic diversity unfortunately becomes a potential liability both to ourselves and those around us.”

Initiatives

And he explained how the coming months will see the focus shift to initiatives to make both the racing and broadcast more attractive with further development of the F50 catamarans.

“I’m confident that our rescheduled second season will go beyond what we would have been able to deliver this year and we’re extremely fortunate to have the ongoing support of partners including Rolex, Oracle, ROCKWOOL and our many broadcasters to help us get there,” added Sir Russell.

British team leader Sir Ben Ainslie added: “I got my first taste of SailGP in Sydney a couple months ago. Racing these boats is a privilege and I know we’ll have that moment again. In the meantime, I’ll be looking to find ways to be even better when we are up and racing again next year.”

SailGP is a newly established global sports championship featuring inshore racing in identical catamarans capable of speeds exceeding 50 knots.

via Boating Business | SailGP 2020 is suspended.

Boating Business | Tall Ships Races postponed

TALL SHIPS RACES POSTPONED

HOMENEWSCOVID-19TALL SHIPS RACES POSTPONED

27 Apr 2020

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The Tall Ships Races will not take place during 2020. Photo credit Sail Training International – Valery Vasilevskiy

Sail Training International has postponed the Tall Ships Races 2020 until next year due to the coronavirus epidemic – the first time this has happened since the event was first held in 1956.

The race attracted more than 4,000 young people from 59 nations in 2019 and attracted nearly six million visitors in the six different race stopover ports.

This year’s event had been scheduled to start in Lisbon on July 2 and finish in Dunkerque on August 9, visiting Cadiz and A Coruna en route.

“It’s a great sadness to us and this year’s host ports to have to postpone the event until next year, but we all agree that a public gathering of this size is out of the question in the midst of a pandemic,” said Jonathan Cheshire, chair of Sail Training International, the UK-based charity that coordinates worldwide sail training. We feel for all the young people who will be disappointed by the decision, but public health and safety must take priority. The financial impact on the charity will be serious, but survivable.”

Prior to the outbreak, Sail Training International had begun a search for new sponsorship to put the event on a more secure long-term footing.

The event received a nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for its work in bringing together large numbers of young people from both sides of the Iron Curtain during the Cold War years.

via Boating Business | Tall Ships Races postponed.

Boating Business | Outhaul traveller kits from Barton Marine

OUTHAUL TRAVELLER KITS FROM BARTON MARINE

HOMENEWSAFTERMARKETMASTS, SPARS, SAILS & RIGGINGOUTHAUL TRAVELLER KITS FROM BARTON MARINE

17 Apr 2020

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Barton Marine has developed a range of outhaul traveller kits Photo: Barton Marine

INDUSTRY DATABASE

BARTON MARINE EQUIPMENT LTD

Following customer feedback, Barton Marine has introduced a range of outhaul traveller kits.

Coming in three sizes for yachts up to 32, 36 and 42ft, each kit comes with a 2.4 or 3m ball bearing track, track end caps, stainless steel fixing screws and aluminium anodised fixing slugs.

Many cruising yachts have been built with in-mast furling mainsails which work well when new but over time can become less efficient. Barton’s new kits enable easy retro-fitting of the new track on to the boom and include a traveller car with upright pulley block which runs on ball bearings.

Furler unit upgrade

Barton has also upgraded two of its furler units. The 42334 bottom furler unit now includes a thicker lining within the furler moulding and a re-profiling of the rope containment forks whilst the 42336 top swivel has been upgraded to incorporate an 8mm halyard clevis pin.

via Boating Business | Outhaul traveller kits from Barton Marine.

Boating Business | Chewing gum technology keeps sailors cool

CHEWING GUM TECHNOLOGY KEEPS SAILORS COOLHOMENEWSAFTERMARKETCLOTHINGCHEWING GUM TECHNOLOGY KEEPS SAILORS COOL20 Apr 2020EmailShareFacebookLinkedInTwitterPrintMusto’s Sunblock Dynamic range contains Xylitol to keep you cool Photo: MustoINDUSTRY DATABASEMUSTO LTDMusto has produced a collection for the British Sailing Team containing a chemical that helps keep sailors cool.The Sunblock Dynamic range contains Xylitol, the chemical in chewing gum that gives the fresh sensation. This enables the kit to lower the surface temperature of the body by up to 3˚C.Nick Houchin at Musto told Boating Business more: “Xylitol yarns have a chemical reaction when in contact with water or sweat that provides a cooling effect.”Combined with the nylon-based fabric, moisture is also absorbed and released to cool the surface temperature of the skin by up to three degrees.”Musto worked with the British Sailing Team to develop the garments that could specifically help cool them in the hot and humid conditions they were likely to encounter at the Olympics in Tokyo. The aim was to create a lightweight breathable garment which would actively cool them when it mattered most.“If they are able to keep cooler than their competitors, it would give them a big advantage out on the racecourse,” explained Nick.The fabric technology was tested in laboratory conditions against a regular polyester sports garment. Observed after a ten minute run in 23˚C at 65% humidity it was found to provide a surface temperature that was one to three degrees lower

via Boating Business | Chewing gum technology keeps sailors cool.

Boating Business | COVID-19: Sailcloth as protective clothing

COVID-19: SAILCLOTH AS PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

HOMENEWSINDUSTRY NEWSCOVID-19: SAILCLOTH AS PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

03 Apr 2020

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The UK Sailmakers gown prototype modelled by Clare Hayes Photo: Afloat

INDUSTRY DATABASE

UK MCWILLIAM SAILMAKERS LTD

Sailmaker Barry Hayes and his UK Sailmakers firm in Ireland are using their skills to make protective equipment for local healthcare workers helping to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

The firm, based in Crosshaven, has suspended its usual operations and instead will deploy its sail making skills to make protective clothing.

“Hopefully we can help in any way we can,” said Claire Morgan, UK Sailmakers’ director. “The sailing season is basically down the toilet. We have to hang tough for a few months.”

The company, which began trading 47 years ago, has held a meeting with the Health and Safety Executive to put forward its plans and determine whether the gowns are suitable for use by the medical profession.

Finalising the design

“We’re in our initial stages of finalising our design and materials to use,” Claire said. “We have sent samples off to a couple of nursing homes as well.”

The firm will be using spinnaker cloth which is lightweight, waterproof, durable and doesn’t rip easily. It can also be cleaned and disinfected easily – the perfect material for protective clothing.

via Boating Business | COVID-19: Sailcloth as protective clothing.