Boating Business | Olympic sailor and Laser designer dies

OLYMPIC SAILOR AND LASER DESIGNER DIES

HOMENEWSINDUSTRY NEWSOLYMPIC SAILOR AND LASER DESIGNER DIES

21 Jul 2021

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Bruce Kirby who died at the age of 92 on 18 July, photographed at Kiel Week in 1972 Photo: Dick Enersen

Bruce Kirby, three-time Olympian, sailing journalist and inventor of the Laser dinghy has died at the age of 92.

Born in Ottawa in Canada, Bruce began his working life as a newspaper journalist before specialising in sailing journalism, becoming editor of One-Design and Offshore Yachtsman, now Sailing World.

He was a keen yachtsman from the beginning, competing in International 14 dinghies from age 15. Design was always a passion and after being beaten in a regatta at Cowes in heavy wind, he drew the Kirby Mark I on a piece of shelf paper. “I had a copy of Skene’s Elements of Yacht Design,” he once said.

“If you can understand 50 per cent of what’s in that book, you can design a boat. Design isn’t brain surgery.”

Designing the Laser

It was whilst working at Sailing World in 1969 that the Laser was designed, beginning its life as a doodle whilst Bruce was talking on the phone. Now renamed the ILCA following a legal dispute, the 50-year-old singlehander now numbers more than 220,000.

Although best known for the Laser, his design career featured many more classes including the Sonar, Kirby 25, Ideal 18 and the America’s Cup Twelve Metres as well as production cruisers such as the San Juan 24 and 30 and offshore racing boats like the Admiral’s Cup 40’ runaway.

Bruce was also a fêted sportsman, representing Canada at three Olympic regattas as well as the America’s Cup and Admiral’s Cup and International 14ft Class at team racing. He was inducted into the Canadian and US Sailing Hall of Fames and Order of Canada, the International Yacht Racing Hall of Fame and the International Laser Class Association Hall of Fame amongst other recognitions.

via Boating Business | Olympic sailor and Laser designer dies.

Boating Business | Sailing ship released following arrest

SAILING SHIP RELEASED FOLLOWING ARREST

HOMENEWSINDUSTRY NEWSSAILING SHIP RELEASED FOLLOWING ARREST

19 Jul 2021

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The ‘Golden Horizon’

A spectacular sailing ship has arrived safely in Torbay following a dramatic arrest over a financial dispute between its original owners and the shipyard who built her.

The Golden Horizon, the world‘s largest square-rigged sailing ship, was detained in Dover on 15 July on the orders of the UK Admiralty Court just hours before she was due to begin her maiden voyage. The arrest was the latest development in a long-running legal dispute between builders Brodosplit Group in Croatia and her original owners, cruise line Star Clippers.

Originally scheduled for 2017, she was delayed until 2019 resulting in the shipyard being ordered to pay the cruise line a reported €6 million plus interest. Star Clippers laid claim to the vessel saying it would only release the ship once the debt was settled.

Payment received

But at the last moment, Star Clippers confirmed it had received a first payment from the shipyard and the Golden Horizon was freed to continue her journey.

A statement issued by Brodosplit and Tradewind Voyages which now owns the ship said, “On the 14 July 2021, at the request of the ship owner, the courts allowed the establishment of a court deposit to pay ‘buyers supply’ after the mortgage was taken out. This mean that a mortgage ceased to exist.

“Therefore we are delighted to be able to inform that you that Golden Horizon has continued its voyage today will be able to sail free of mortgages, across all the planned seas of the world wherever it is carried by the trade winds.”

At 8,770 tonnes and a length of 531 feet, the five-masted Golden Horizon is a near replica of the France II, built in 1913. She has over 6,000 square metres of sail, more than twice that of the Cutty Sark. She has accommodation for 300 passengers and 140 crew, with a restaurant, bars, pools, gym and spa.

via Boating Business | Sailing ship released following arrest.

Boating Business | Eddie Jordan: new brand ambassador

EDDIE JORDAN: NEW BRAND AMBASSADOR

HOMENEWSPEOPLEEDDIE JORDAN: NEW BRAND AMBASSADOR

19 Jul 2021

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Eddie Jordan has taken an ambassadorial role at Oyster Yachts

INDUSTRY DATABASE

OYSTER YACHTS

Oyster Yachts has appointed Eddie Jordan as brand ambassador.

After three years on the board of directors at Oyster Yachts, Eddie Jordan, former motorsport team owner and Oyster owner moved from his non-executive director position in July 2021 to take up the new ambassadorial role.

“Eddie’s presence within Oyster has been invaluable,” said Richard Hadida, CEO and Oyster Yachts owner. “He knows the true quality of our yachts and those that craft them. Keeping Eddie close to the business and a voice of Oyster was priority for me and the brand.”

Eddie will continue to collaborate with Oyster on a programme of activity to enhance the boatbuilder’s global brand awareness.

“Having circumnavigated the world on an Oyster, I have a very special relationship with Oyster Yachts,” said Eddie. “I relished the opportunity to stay closely involved with this truly magical brand and their yachts.”

via Boating Business | Eddie Jordan: new brand ambassador.

Boating Business | Cape Horn assists with EcoClipper design

CAPE HORN ASSISTS WITH ECOCLIPPER DESIGN

HOMENEWSINDUSTRY NEWSCAPE HORN ASSISTS WITH ECOCLIPPER DESIGN

01 Jul 2021

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Cape Horn Engineering is using its CFD expertise to assist with the hull design for a fleet of EcoClippers Photo: Cape Horn Engineering

INDUSTRY DATABASE

CAPE HORN ENGINEERING

Marine technology consultant Cape Horn Engineering is to assist with the design of the first EcoClipper ship, which will use the power of the wind to propel cargo, passengers and trainees around the world’s oceans.

The EcoClipper500 will be built in steel and is based on the design of the Dutch clipper Noach, launched in 1857. Its development will use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology to optimise critical elements such as weight saving, performance predictions and emissions reduction.

Cape Horn Engineering, which has been at the forefront of America’s Cup and Ocean Racing design campaigns for more than 15 years, was chosen by EcoClipper to provide the CFD analysis for the design of the first hull shape. Chief executive, Dr Rodrigo Azcueta, said the company was delighted to be involved in the project. “We are dedicated to reducing shipping emissions and improving air pollution, and we have a strong desire to contribute to such developments, to help protect our planet,” he said.

CFD design optimisation

With such a complex sail plan, consisting of three square rigged masts and 29 sails with an area of around 1,580m2, the generation of a full aerodynamic model was not possible. Therefore, sail coefficients for similar sailing vessels found in literature had to be used to enable accurate calculations to be made for the hydrodynamic performance of the hull candidates.

Another detailed investigation was aimed at finding the best possible position to install the hydro-generators that will provide the electricity requirements of the vessel.

via Boating Business | Cape Horn assists with EcoClipper design.

Boating Business | Regulations for masts?

REGULATIONS FOR MASTS?

HOMENEWSAFTERMARKETMASTS, SPARS, SAILS & RIGGINGREGULATIONS FOR MASTS?

30 Jun 2021

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Regulations probably should be introduced for masts and rigging in the leisure market.

That’s the opinion of marine consultant David Barrow who carries out surveys for MS Amlin and was director of Sparcraft for 20 years.

“I’ve seen many bent and broken masts over the years. There’s no real regulation of masts and rigging in the leisure sector,” he said. “There’s no specific rule to change a boat’s rigging after ten years.”

And he pointed out that while superyachts are regulated under MCA regs and boats that have done a circumnavigation usually have a survey carried out, when it comes to other boats, owners often don’t see the need.

If a boat had suffered a knock, this could affect the rigging without the owner knowing. If a boat was inspected very few years, there would be more chances to look at the mast.

“It’s not the insurers’ job to regulate the rigging business; the insurer’s job is to behave according to the results of their surveys,” David says.

Maintenance

“There can be a mass of different reasons as to why masts fall down, but quite a few are because of maintenance issues.

“I’ve seen other masts where there have been technical issues with the masts themselves.”

This is particularly the case with carbon masts – a relatively new product when it comes to masts – where there could be gremlins within the manufacture and possible delamination.

“It’s pretty hard to get insurance for a carbon mast, especially in a race boat as insurers are not going to pay for their development any longer.

“Some insurers are calling for NDT inspections before the masts leave the factory.

“Regulations probably do need to come in.”

via Boating Business | Regulations for masts?.

Boating Business | Doublebraid is the latest addition

DOUBLEBRAID IS THE LATEST ADDITION

HOMENEWSAFTERMARKETMASTS, SPARS, SAILS & RIGGINGDOUBLEBRAID IS THE LATEST ADDITION

24 Jun 2021

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Marlow’s Doublebraid can be used for a variety of purposes onboard

INDUSTRY DATABASE

MARLOW ROPES LTD

Blue Ocean Doublebraid is Marlow Ropes’ latest addition to its eco-conscious Blue Ocean product range, manufactured from sustainable materials.

The heat-set braid-on-braid Doublebraid is made from 100% recycled waste plastic bottles and follows the release of the company’s Blue Ocean Dockline.

Since the launch of the Blue Ocean Dockline in 2018, more than half of Marlow’s yachting range is now manufactured using sustainable materials.

The latest Blue Ocean product can be used for a variety of on-board applications.

It is available on a reel as standard and also as spliced finished assemblies on request.

“It offers flexibility and easy handling for all sailors, and now has the reassurance of being sustainably manufactured,” explained Marlow’s leisure marine director, Paul Honess.

Carbon footprint

“The addition of this new product demonstrates Marlow’s on-going commitment to sustainable manufacturing by reducing and eliminating our negative environmental impact through the introduction of the Blue Ocean product range and company-wide Blue Ocean initiatives which focus on reducing energy consumption, waste and the company’s carbon footprint.”

And he explained it’s important to Marlow to take responsibility and become more sustainable while providing customers with more rope options.

“We have worked hard over the last couple of years to eliminate plastics from our ranges, lower our carbon footprint and introduce sustainable materials,” he added.

“With half of our range now made using these sustainable materials we are getting closer to achieving our target of using 100% reliance on recycled materials by 2030.”

via Boating Business | Doublebraid is the latest addition.

Boating Business | New vang and mainsheet kits

NEW VANG AND MAINSHEET KITS

HOMEXPORT BBMSSRNEW VANG AND MAINSHEET KITS

Barton Marine’s new Laser downhaul and kicker kits are class legal

INDUSTRY DATABASE

BARTON MARINE EQUIPMENT LTD

Barton Marine has launched new three sizes of its vang and mainsheet kit.

Available in sizes 2, 3 and 5 these fully rigged sets include everything required for easy installation and are designed to help make boaters’ experiences on the water smoother.

The size 2 kit (02900) is suitable for boats up to 22ft and is supplied with shackle fittings and a spliced soft eye for maximum strength.

Sizes 3 (03900) and 5 (05900) have snap shackles top and bottom with a length of line, again attached with a spliced soft eye.

These are suitable for yachts up to 25ft and 35ft and are free running to help reliable control of a mainsail or boom.

New Laser kits

Working with the company’s ‘Rising Star’ sailor Harry Newton of Whitstable Yacht Club, Barton has developed its Laser kits for summer 2021.

The new downhaul kit provides increased purchase with an 8:1 inline pulley system and is class legal for ILCA and Laser classes.

The kicker kit features a chunkier swivel post on the triple block to enable smoother rotation of the block and additional strength for improved stability.

A pillar fairlead is now included to make cleating and releasing of the rope easier.

“When races are won by fractions of a second, everything needs to click into place perfectly and the new Laser Class legal, Barton Kicker Kit does just that,” said Christian Brewer, Barton global sales manager.

via Boating Business | New vang and mainsheet kits.

Boating Business | Demand up for extreme rigging

DEMAND UP FOR EXTREME RIGGING

HOMENEWSAFTERMARKETMASTS, SPARS, SAILS & RIGGINGDEMAND UP FOR EXTREME RIGGING

28 Jun 2021

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Racing Dyneema 99 Pro Halyard Photo: Kingfisher Yacht Ropes

INDUSTRY DATABASE

KINGFISHER YACHT ROPES

Kingfisher Yacht Ropes is seeing a big increase in demand for its lines, halyards and rigging ropes.

Sales have increased of associated products for rigging, including products the company distributes in the UK from Tylaska such as premium shackles, LOOP Products, D Splicer and Selma splicing equipment.

Since the beginning of 2021, all Dyneema products distributed by Kingfisher Yacht Ropes have been changed to bio-based fibre as part of the company’s commitment to sustainability. For every one tonne of bio-based Dyneema purchased, five tonnes of CO2 emissions are avoided when compared to standard Dyneema fibres.

Extreme products

The company has seen an upturn in sales of more extreme products with Dyneema cores and technical covers made from Technora, Dyneema or Kevlar with the launch of last year’s Racing Dyneema 99 Pro Halyard proving particularly successful. With diameters of 8, 10 and 12mm and breaking strengths ranging from 3,570 to 7,650kg, the halyard has been designed to provide the best possible holding ability in clutches and jammers.

Also proving popular is Kingfisher’s range of Gottifredi Maffioli GP custom products, designed with professional racing teams.

Kingfisher Yacht Ropes will be showcasing its range of products at this year’s Cowes Week, from its base in Cowes Yacht Haven where the company will be providing technical information and regatta support.

via Boating Business | Demand up for extreme rigging.

Boating Business | Marlow Ropes joins Made in Britain

MARLOW ROPES JOINS MADE IN BRITAIN

HOMENEWSINDUSTRY NEWSMARLOW ROPES JOINS MADE IN BRITAIN

28 Jun 2021

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Marlow’s workforce at their British headquarters in Hailsham, East Sussex.

INDUSTRY DATABASE

MARLOW ROPES LTD

Marlow Ropes has been accredited as a member of Made in Britain enabling the manufacturer to adopt the official, protected mark of the organisation.

The mark is intended to help buyers recognise products as being of good quality, great value and British-made.

“We are very proud of our British manufacturing heritage as a leading rope-maker,” said Marlow Ropes MD Jon Mitchell. “Our high performing rope solutions are made to the highest standards with innovation, quality and sustainability at their core, and to me, this embodies a Great British manufactured product.

“We are pleased to now share this mantle with fellow colleagues in the manufacturing industry.”

John Pearce, chief executive of Made in Britain added: “We’re delighted that Marlow Ropes has joined the community of more than 1200 British manufacturers.

“The more the mark is used and seen, the more it is recognised as a mark of quality.”

via Boating Business | Marlow Ropes joins Made in Britain.

Boating Business | Allen solves mast tapering problem

ALLEN SOLVES MAST TAPERING PROBLEMHOMENEWSAFTERMARKETMASTS, SPARS, SAILS & RIGGINGALLEN SOLVES MAST TAPERING PROBLEM24 Jun 2021EmailShareFacebookLinkedInTwitterPrintA new mast being formed at Allen’s workshop in Essex Photo: Allen BrothersINDUSTRY DATABASEALLEN BROTHERS (FITTINGS) LTDSailing hardware company Allen Brothers has used 3d model technology to solve the problem of inconsistencies in masts for the Dragon keelboat.Mast tapers are needed to get the best shape and performance from a sail. The process for creating them is straightforward but it is difficult to achieve a consistent result. Sailors and boat builders were noticing that the bend characteristics differed between each mast, meaning that, if one needed to be replaced, the tuning and set up measurements would no longer be valid.Allen set about determining what was causing these slight variations, using its 3d CAD and machining expertise to produce a scan of the desired taper which could then be used to reverse-engineer a 3d model for repeated use.ConsistencyDarren Elwell, design manager at Allen, said the aim was to produce a consistent tapered mast. “One that would result in the same bend characteristics and make rig tunning easier between the different boats,” he said.Using the 3d CAD data the design team was able to manufacture a set of forming tools that repeated the profile of the taper. “We had surmised that the forming operation was going to be the most difficult operation to achieve and quickly realised we would need to somehow form the taper from top to bottom to allow us to control the sizes of the taper,” said Tom Clayton, product designer at Allen.The company has perfected the technique, producing 20 masts so far. “I believe we have certainly nailed the brief. The taper is identical across all the sections and looks much neater than the previous version,” said Mr Elwell.

via Boating Business | Allen solves mast tapering problem.